Archive for the ‘Euro Pale Lager’ Category

I could swear that I’ve had this beer before, way before I was into craft beer. When I was in my early twenties, I lived in an area of New Jersey with a dense Polish population and beers from Poland were plentiful, “exotic” (at least to me) and cheap (the perfect combination for a thrifty twenty-something). I have no recollection of my thoughts on the beer and since my palate has changed, I thought it would be interesting to try.

lomzamalt

ABV: 7.8%

Style: Euro Pale Lager

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “Browar Łomża Brewery has been brewing since 1968. The plant was modernized in 2004 and has a capacity to brew up to 850 thousand hectolitres. Traditionally it used to brew three slightly different beers: ‘Kurpie’, ‘Wyborowe’ and ‘Export’. Later came ‘Łomża Strong’ but it was not particularly successful and has now been discontinued. In 2010 Browar Łomża came up with a new taste ‘miodowe’ (honey). After ownership changes and due to marketing campaigns, new brands such as ‘Łomża niepasteryzowane’ (unpasteurised) and ‘Łomża Export niepasteryzowane’ are gaining popularity.”

Random: I used to know a few words in Polish. The only thing I remember now is “piwo” (beer).

This beer poured with a half a finger of white head that dissipated instantly. It left no lacing on the glass. The body was hazy and a dusky light orange color with light carbonation. The nose smelled like grain and old apples. There was also alcohol in there. The taste was incredibly sweet. It had old apple juice, corn and bread. I was shocked at the level of apple juice in it. Alcohol was incredibly prevalent and had a lot of warming on the back of the throat. The body was medium thickness and the carbonation was very light. It had a lengthy, sweet finish. A sixteen ounce bottle of this was cheap at $1.99 ($.12 per ounce). Although I appreciated the price tag, I was not impressed by this beer and I won’t be having it again.

Untappd Rating: 2.5/5.0

Tonight’s selection is another beer from Poland. I used to live in an area of Jersey that had a lot of people from Poland, so I’ve had this beer before, although I’ve never formally reviewed it.

o.k. beer

ABV: 5.6%

Style: Euro Pale Lager

Trivia: According to the brewery website, “The brewery was established in 1845 by Johann Evangelist Götz (1815-1893), a German beer maker born in Wirtemberg together with Joseph Neumann, from Austria-Hungary, and local Polish noble, Julian Kodrębski. The first batch of beer was brewed on February 23, 1846. During the ‘Rabacja’, an Austrian-inspired peasant uprising in Galicia in 1846, directed at Polish nobility as well as affluent merchants, Götz barely escaped with his life. He survived thanks to help from local friends and the fact that the workers of his brewery stood up in his defense, certifying that his business provided good pay and decent working conditions. In turn, Götz helped to save the life of Julian Kodrębski, who had partly funded his brewery, by hiding him in woods on the banks of the Uszwica river in Brzesko, and providing him with food which was delivered over the course of ten days by workers from the brewery.”

Random: This can looks like it hasn’t been redesigned since 1845.

This beer poured with a half a finger of white head. It dissipated instantly and left no lacing on the glass. It left a small crown on top of the clear, straw-yellow body. There was slight carbonation visible in the body. The nose was sweet and filled with corn. It also had a mustiness to it, like a wet basement. There was also some pilsner malt apparent. The taste was also sweet up front with pilsner malt and cracker. It had a tinge of grassy bitterness. The body was light and crisp with moderate carbonation. It had a quick and clean finish with pilsner malt. A pounder can was $1.25 ($.08 per ounce), which was quite affordable. I thought I was going to hate this beer, but it wasn’t bad. It was a bit boring, but I had no problem drinking it and would have it again.

Untappd Rating: 3.5/5.0

It’s rare that I open up a beer and Val asks what the awful smell is that is permeating the living room. Although I had a feeling that this beer was not going to be great, in my effort to try as many different beers as possible, I went on with the review, although I caution you against having it.

lech

ABV: 5.2%

Style: Euro Pale Lager

Trivia: According to the beerstore.ca, “Lech Beer is has a golden colour, light aroma, soft, light texture, lightly sweet flavours with a gently bitter finish.”

Random: I’d be curious to know if this beer is popular in Poland (where it’s brewed) or if they think it’s just as terrible as I do.

The beer poured with a one finger, pure white head. It dissipated instantly and left no lacing on the glass. There was a quarter of a finger of crown, left on top of the clear, golden-yellow body. It had a light carbonation visible. Also of note, this was bottled in green glass, which is not a good sign for the liquid inside. The nose was very strong with a lot of skunk as soon as the cap came off. I couldn’t pick up much else because of how powerful it was. The taste had a lot of skunk as well, with grain that gave some toasted bread notes. But, the skunk note overwhelmed everything. The body was thicker than expected with lots of carbonation. It had a quick finish with skunk. A bottle of this was $1.59 ($.10 per ounce), which is cheap, although even if it were free, I wouldn’t take it home. I found this beer hard to describe because it was so simple and so…well, awful. It was a chore to drink and one of the worst that I’ve had in recent memory. Needless to say, I won’t be having it again.

Untappd Rating: 0.5/5.0

This was the second beer that I had at Boma. It was either this or Tusker, which I know that I can get at home, so Casablanca it is. They also had a bunch of African wines to try, but I pretty much stuck with beer.

ABV: 5%

Style: Euro Pale Lager

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “Beer production in Morocco was introduced by the French in the 20th century. Currently, Société des Brasseries du Maroc oversees the production and distribution. Popular beers include Spéciale Flag (pilsner) and Stork (light lager). Their premium beer is Casablanca (also a lager), which costs more than the other two. Casablanca is served in the Morocco pavilion at Epcot in Disney World, Orlando, FL, and is popular with beer drinkers eager to try a beer from an Islamic country that allows secular vices alongside the virtues of the predominant faith. The breweries are located in Fes, Tangier, and Casablanca, a bottling unit exists in Marrakech.”

Random: Half of the plane from the movie, “Casablanca” is in the Jungle Cruise ride.

As soon as this one poured, it looked exactly like a macro. It poured with a one finger, white head that dissipated quickly and left no lacing on the glass. The body was more like a golden-yellow color with low to moderate carbonation visible. The nose was way too light with a hint of metal. The taste wasn’t as bad as the last one. I got some bitterness, corn and then the slightly unpleasant metal notes. The body was on the lighter side with high carbonation. The finish was quick and unremarkable. I wish I could find more to say about this one, but it was seriously boring and underflavored. Only get this one for the novelty of it, then switch to something better.

Untappd Rating: 2.0/5.0

Here’s another beer that Kate picked up for me. Not shockingly, it’s a British beer. I really think she just picks based off the labels. I actually found a new fruity thing that she loves. It’s Mike’s Hard Lemonade – Black Cherry. It’s one of the few from them that doesn’t get old after one or two and isn’t sickeningly syrupy sweet. So, onto the brew.

ABV: 5%

Style: Euro Pale Lager

Trivia: According to the importer, “Samuel Smith is most famous for classic ales, but it also offers what is described as ‘England’s finest lager.’ The all-malt beer is brewed with a softer water and fermented in separately-housed stainless steel lager vessels using bottom-fermenting yeast.”

Random: I hate the heat. It has been oppressively hot and it’s just ridiculous. I’m ready for winter.

This brew poured with a huge white head that dissipated slowly, yet left no lacing on the pint glass. The body was a clear, straw yellow color with lots of active carbonation. It almost looked like a macro. The nose had some sweet grain (which bordered on too sweet for me) and a little hay. I thought the taste would start with the really sweet grain that was apparent in the nose, but it didn’t. I got hay and some grass first and then the sweetness came through at the end of the sip. I was pleasantly surprised that the sweetness wasn’t obnoxious or abrasive. I really liked it. The grain also had some earthy notes to it. The body was a medium thickness with generous carbonation and finished quickly. This was definitely a session beer. For a beer that I thought would be a struggle to drink, I really enjoyed it. I could see throwing a few of these back on a hot day. I would have this again.

Untappd Rating: 3.0/5.0

Stella Artois

Posted: April 21, 2012 in Euro Pale Lager, Reviews, Stella Artois

So, Katie and I ended up at Country Night. I pretty much watched the Yankees game while listening to music. As usual for this place, every craft beer I went to order off the menu they didn’t have. So, I gave up. It had a decent selection of macros and imports, so I figured I would just order some of them to review since I haven’t yet. This is a brew that I’ve had out of the bottle a few times and wasn’t exactly thrilled with. This time, I’m trying it on draft to review it.

ABV: 5.00%

Style: Euro Pale Lager

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “Tax records exist from 1366 for Leuven’s Den Horen Brewery. In 1708, Sebastianus Artois became the master brewer at Den Horen, and gave his name to the brewery in 1717. In 1926, Stella Artois was launched initially as a seasonal beer especially for the Christmas holiday market. First sold in Canada, it was such a commercial success it became available year round and, apart from the duration of the Second World War, has been produced ever since. The first Stella Artois beer was exported to the European market in 1930. By 1960, 100 million litres of Stella Artois were being produced annually. InBev opened a new fully automated brewery in Leuven in 1993, and by 2006, total production volume was over a billion litres annually.”

Random: I wish it was served in the actual “Stella” glass. That’s the best part of it.

This brew poured with a head that had a fluffy egg white consistency and a pure white color that was about one finger high. It didn’t leave a lot of lacing on the glass. The body was a clear, straw yellow with little carbonation. The nose was a bit boring with a bit of skunk and metal. The taste was more mild than I expected. The skunkiness wasn’t all that pronounced and I got more grain than anything. I got some honey sweetness as well. The body was medium, with more than expected carbonation and a sweet, quick finish. It was much better on draft than I remember out of the bottle. I would have it again if there were no other options. But, as a whole, only a mediocre brew.

Untappd Rating: 3.0/5.0

Harp Lager

Posted: March 17, 2012 in Euro Pale Lager, Guinness Ltd., Reviews

The last beer of the Irish six-pack. Harp is a beer that I’ve had on multiple occasions, albeit not in a very long time. I had it when I was in Ireland, and the locals would say that this was made for the Americans to drink. If they wanted something lighter than Guinness, they’d drink Smithwicks or Budweiser. But, I drank it just the same. I even used to look for it when I went out, simply because it was an Irish beer. I don’t think I ever thought that it was fantastic though. It’s also brewed by Guinness and has the classic Irish “harp” on the label.

ABV: 5%

Style: Euro Pale Lager

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “Harp Lager was first produced in 1960 as a bottled beer by the Guinness company (now Diageo), in response to the trend among drinkers in Britain and Ireland towards continental lager. Guinness converted its Dundalk brewery into a modern lager production plant with the guidance of Dr. Herman Muender, a distinguished German brewer. Various names were considered for the brand, including Atlas, Cresta and Dolphin, before Harp was chosen. The brand was marketed with the Brian Boru harp as its emblem. The manufacturer states that Harp is made with pure water from the Cooley Mountains, Dundalk.”

Random: At one point, I considered getting a tattoo of the Irish harp. Then, I actually saw it on someone and didn’t really like it and decided otherwise. I have a claddagh instead.

This brew poured with a half a finger of white head that dissipated quickly and left no lacing on the glass. The body was a clear straw yellow color with a large amount of carbonation. The nose smelled a lot like a macro with some corn and sweetness from the malt. The taste was actually not as bad as I expected given the style. The sweetness was toned down a bit with some bitterness to it and a bit of grain. It was pretty unoffensive, actually. The thin body with lots of carbonation made it very crisp as well.The finish was quick with a hint of bitterness. Honestly, although I’m not a huge fan of the style, I’d take this one over a macro any day. Not bad!

Untappd Rating: 3.0/5.0