The Bruery Tripel Berry Hand Pie

We’ve been really busy at work lately, in advance of the holiday. Since I haven’t worked in clinical trials for an extended period time and with COVID-19, I’m never exactly sure when we’re going to be super busy. I’m looking forward to spending the weekend and putting my feet up.

ABV: 11.8%

Style: American Wild Ale

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “A semilunar pastry with either a sweet or savory filling, formed by placing a dollop of filling onto a circular piece of biscuit-style dough and then folding it over and crimping it shut. They may be baked, fried or deep-fried. A pasty.”

Random: I have never had a hand pie. I’m not a huge fan of sweets, although Val is an outstanding baker and makes some of the best sweet treats that I have ever had.

The beer poured with a half a finger of pinkish tinged head that dissipated quickly, leaving no lacing on the glass. It did leave a small crown on top of the body. The body was a deep reddish-pink color with no visible carbonation due to the color. The nose was very tart and filled with berries. There was a slight amount of vanilla as well. The taste was also very powerfully tart. The underripe berries hit in the palate all at the same time with only a bit of graham cracker and vanilla to back it up. There was a decent amount of alcohol as well on this. The body was on the medium side with some carbonation present. The finish was lengthy and a bit too tart for me. I was really excited about this beer, it was just too intense for me. I wouldn’t rush back to this one.

Untappd Rating: 3.0/5.0

The Bruery Chocolate Rain – Cherry

Since the weather has been nicer, we’ve been leaving the window open (with the screen in) and the cats have enjoyed the breeze and looking at the wildlife. They’re a bit spoiled.

ABV: 19.5%

Style: American Double/Imperial Stout

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “TCHO is a chocolate maker based in Berkeley, California that promotes itself as working with cacao bean farmers and cooperatives to improve growing, fermentation and drying methods. Its factory and headquarters were formerly located on Pier 17 along the Embarcadero, in San Francisco’s historic downtown waterfront district, but are now located in the West Berkeley section of Berkeley, California. In February 2018, it was announced that TCHO will be bought by the Japanese confectionery company Ezaki Glico.”

Random: I’ve had a few different types of TCHO chocolate and really enjoyed them all. I wouldn’t mind having more types from them either. TCHO chocolate was also used in this beer.

The beer poured with a half a finger of tan head that hung around for awhile and left limited lacing on the glass. A small crown was left on the body, which was dark brown with no visible carbonation. The nose was huge on this beer. I got generous amounts of cherry with cocoa as well. I could also pick up on the booze, but at 19.5%, that’s not surprising. The taste was filled with dark chocolate and cherries with booze. After the first few sips, the booze calmed down a bit and some bourbon came out. The body was thick and had light carbonation. The finish was lengthy with dark chocolate and booze and bourbon. This beer was outstanding and one that I would have again.

Untappd Rating: 5.0/5.0

The Bruery White Chocolate

The weather is starting to get nicer out so I’m looking forward to sitting outside a bit more. I’m still trying to stay away from people as much as possible, but it’s nice to get some sunshine.

ABV: 14.8%

Style: Wheatwine

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “In 1837 the Mexican government granted the area that is now Placentia to Juan Pacifico Ontiveros as part of the Rancho San Juan Cajón de Santa Ana land grant. In 1865 American pioneer Daniel Kraemer arrived and purchased 3900 acres. Many other American pioneers soon followed and the community developed. The local school district was originally named the Cajon School District. In 1878 the school district’s name was changed to Placentia School District, Placentia being derived from a Latin word meaning ‘pleasant place to live.’ The town eventually took its own name after the school district.”

Random: I’ve been listening to more podcasts when I drive to work. I can’t watch the news, but I really like “Pod Save America.” If you’re into politics, it’s worth a listen.

The beer poured with a half a finger of white head. It dissipated quickly, but left some lacing on that glass. The body was cloudy and bright orange. There was a moderate amount of carbonation visible. The nose had some vanilla, white sugar and cocoa. There was some toffee as well. The taste was much of the same. It had a generous amount of vanilla and toffee with caramel as well. There was some cocoa too. The booze was noticeable, but didn’t take away from the beer. The body was on the thicker side with light carbonation. It had a sticky and lengthy finish with vanilla and caramel sweetness. I thought this was a really good beer and would definitely have it again.

Untappd Rating: 4.0/5.0

The Bruery Mash & French Toast

Another Monday over, time to open a beer.

ABV: 13.4%

Style: English Barleywine

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “The earliest known reference to French toast is in the Apicius, a collection of Latin recipes dating to the 4th or 5th century, where it is described as simply aliter dulcia (‘another sweet dish’). The recipe says to ‘Break [slice] fine white bread, crust removed, into rather large pieces which soak in milk [and beaten eggs] fry in oil, cover with honey and serve.’ A fourteenth-century German recipe uses the name Arme Ritter (‘poor knights’), a name also used in English and the Nordic languages. Also in the fourteenth century, Taillevent presented a recipe for ‘tostées dorées’. Italian 15th-century culinary expert Martino da Como offers a recipe. The usual French name is pain perdu, ‘lost bread’, reflecting its use of stale or otherwise ‘lost’ bread — which gave birth to the metaphoric term pain perdu for sunk costs. It may also be called pain doré, ‘golden bread’, in Canada. There are fifteenth-century English recipes for pain perdu. An Austrian and Bavarian term is pafese or pofese, from zuppa pavese, referring to Pavia, Italy. The word ‘soup’ in the dish’s name refers to bread soaked in a liquid, a sop. In Hungary, it is commonly called bundáskenyér (lit. ‘furry bread’).”

Random: French toast is one of my favorite sweet breakfast treats.

The beer poured with a light brown, one finger head. It dissipated quickly and left very little lacing on the glass. The body was a dark brown and clear with light carbonation visible. The nose was filled with sweetness. I picked up caramel and maple syrup and then cinnamon. There was vanilla as well. The taste was sticky and sweet with lots of maple syrup and brown sugar. The vanilla came out as well. I also picked up a bourbon note. The booze was noticeable, but not overwhelming. It had a thick and chewy body with light carbonation. The finish was sweet and lengthy. I really enjoyed this beer, although this is definitely a sipper. This is worth seeking out.

Untappd Rating: 4.5/5.0

The Bruery White Chocolate Warmer

Tonight’s beer is another from The Bruery. Since we chose not to buy into the Society this year, you’ll eventually see the beers from them drop off. But until then, let’s crack this open…

ABV: 14%

Style: Wheatwine

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “White chocolate does not contain cocoa solids (the non-fat component of cocoa). Cocoa solids are the primary constituent of conventional chocolate liquor — chocolate in its raw, unsweetened form. During manufacturing, the dark-colored solids of the cocoa bean are separated from its fatty content, as with milk chocolate and dark chocolate. As a result, this cocoa butter is the only cocoa ingredient in white chocolate. Because it contains no cocoa solids, white chocolate contains only trace amounts of the stimulants theobromine and caffeine. White chocolate may include additional flavorings, such as vanilla.”

Random: I have never enjoyed white chocolate. It’s always a bit too sweet for me.

The beer poured with a thick, one finger, slightly off white head. It dissipated slowly and left a lot of lacing on the glass. The body was slightly hazy and a dusky reddish-brown color. The nose was very fragrant with white chocolate, sugar and booze. There was some vanilla as well. The taste was much of the same. There was a decent amount of booze and vanilla with white chocolate. There was some maple and oak as well. I picked up caramel as well. The body was on the thicker side with light carbonation. It had a sweet and lengthy finish with white chocolate. I thought this was a decent beer, just a bit too sweet.

Untappd Rating: 3.5/5.0

The Bruery So Happens It’s Tuesday – Mole

Tonight’s beer has me craving Mexican food. Let’s see how it was.

ABV: 15%

Style: American Double/Imperial Stout

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “Two states in Mexico claim to be the origin of mole: Puebla and Oaxaca. The best-known moles are native to these two states, but other regions in Mexico also make various types of mole sauces. Moles come in various flavors and ingredients, with chili peppers as the common ingredient. The classic mole version is the variety called mole poblano, which is a dark red or brown sauce served over meat. The dish has become a culinary symbol of Mexico’s mestizaje, or mixed indigenous and European heritage, both for the types of ingredients it contains and because of the legends surrounding its origin. A common legend of its creation takes place at the Convent of Santa Clara in Puebla early in the colonial period. Upon hearing that the archbishop was going to visit, the convent nuns panicked because they were poor and had almost nothing to prepare. The nuns prayed and brought together the little bits of what they did have, including chili peppers, spices, day-old bread, nuts, and a little chocolate. They killed an old turkey, cooked it and put the sauce on top; the archbishop loved it. When one of the nuns was asked the name of the dish, she replied, ‘I made a mole.’ Mole is an archaic word for mix; now this word mostly refers to the dish, and is rarely used to signify other kinds of mixes in Spanish. A similar version of the story says that monk Fray Pascual invented the dish, again to serve the archbishop of Puebla. In this version, spices were knocked over or blown over into pots in which chicken were cooking. Other versions of the story substitute the viceroy of New Spain, such as Juan de Palafox y Mendoza in place of the archbishop.”

Random: One of the best moles I’ve ever had was in Chicago at Frontera Grill. Once we can travel again, I want to go to Chicago.

The beer poured with a half a finger of light brown head topping a dark brown, almost black body. The head dissipated slowly and left limited lacing on the glass. The nose started with milk chocolate and roasted malts, along with some cinnamon. There was a lot of alcohol as well. The taste had the same milk chocolate note along with cinnamon and some hot pepper as well. There was booze and oak as well. The body was thick with light carbonation. It had a sticky finish with hot pepper and cinnamon and chocolate. I thought this beer was exceptional and would definitely have this again.

Untappd Rating: 4.5/5.0

The Bruery So Happens It’s Tuesday – S’mores

I love s’mores. We have a family reunion every year and at the end of the night, we start a fire pit and make s’mores. It’s one of my favorite things – so a s’more beer is right up my alley.

ABV: 15%

Style: American Double/Imperial Stout

Trivia: According to wikipedia.com, “S’more is a contraction of the phrase
‘some more’. One early published recipe for a s’more is found in a book of recipes published by the Campfire Marshmallows company in the 1920s, where it was called a ‘Graham Cracker Sandwich’. The text indicates that the treat was already popular with both Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. In 1927, a recipe for ‘Some More’ was published in Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts. The contracted term ‘s’mores’ appears in conjunction with the recipe in a 1938 publication aimed at summer camps. A 1956 recipe uses the name ‘S’Mores’, and lists the ingredients as ‘a sandwich of two graham crackers, toasted marshmallow and ​1⁄2 chocolate bar’. A 1957 Betty Crocker cookbook contains a similar recipe under the name of ‘s’mores’. The 1958 publication Intramural and Recreational Sports for High School and College makes reference to ‘marshmallow toasts’ and ‘s’mores hikes’ as does its related predecessor, Intramural and Recreational Sports for Men and Women, published in 1949.”

Random: Despite my aversion to sticky foods, I have always enjoyed marshmallows.

This beer poured with a half a finger of brown head that dissipated slowly and only left some lacing on the glass. The body was dark brown, almost black. I didn’t see much carbonation due to the color. The nose was filled with roasted malts, chocolate, oak and vanilla. The marshmallow note was minimal on the nose. The taste started with milk chocolate and quickly went into oak and vanilla. There was some maple notes with graham cracker and a touch of marshmallow. The alcohol provided some heat, but not as much as the 15% would imply. The body was thick and carbonation was low. It had a sticky and lengthy finish with chocolate. This beer was exceptional and I would definitely have it again.

Untappd Rating: 4.5/5.0

The Bruery 11 Pipers Piping – Scotch Barrel Aged

Every time I have a Scottish Ale, I remember how much I enjoy them. This beer is no different.

ABV: 13.2%

Style: Scottish Ale

Trivia: According to beeradvocate.com, “Scottish-Style Ales vary depending on strength and flavor, but in general retain a malt-forward character with some degree of caramel-like malt flavors and a soft and chewy mouthfeel. Some examples feature a light smoked peat flavor. Hops do not play a huge role in this style. The numbers commonly associated with brands of this style (60/70/80 and others) reflect the Scottish tradition of listing the cost, in shillings, of a hogshead (large cask) of beer. Overly smoked versions would be considered specialty examples. Smoke or peat should be restrained.”

Random: It’s been a long time since I’ve had a Scottish Ale. They’re getting harder to find.

The beer poured with a thick, one finger, light tan head. It dissipated slowly and left a lot of lacing on the glass. The body was very dark in color and almost black, with no carbonation visible. The nose was huge. It was filled with oak and peat and some burnt brown sugar as well. The taste was equally large. It started with peat and smoke and went into brown sugar and toffee. There was a lot of booze on this one and it was bordering on too much. There was some maple syrup too. The body was medium thickness and had a decent amount of carbonation. The finish was lengthy and smoky. I enjoyed this beer a lot and would have it again.

Untappd Rating: 4.0/5.0

The Bruery Brycescotti

I can’t believe it’s May already. The weeks keep blending into each other. We had snow over the weekend, which I don’t think I’ve ever seen.

ABV: 13.3%

Style: American Double/Imperial Porter

Trivia: According to the brewery website, “The Bruery is a boutique craft brewery located in Orange County, CA specializing in barrel aged and experimental ales. Founded as a small, friend & family run business in 2008, The Bruery takes its unique moniker from founder Patrick Rue’s family surname. Patrick picked up homebrewing as a hobby, later to become an obsession, as a distraction to the banality of law school. Soon he was winning numerous awards for his beers and driving his wife, Rachel, mad with the messes that he would leave on the kitchen stove. Upon finishing school, he took it upon himself to draw up a business plan rather than study for the California Bar exam – a risky endeavor that shows through still today in the creative, genre-tilting beers that The Bruery prides itself on. The Bruery is founded on the excitement that Patrick felt in those first years of homebrewing and we continue to strive for that same passion in every aspect of our business today. We never stop challenging ourselves to develop distinctive & imaginative beers, constantly pursuing improvement in all that we do. We brew dozens of original beers each year with our list of ingredients and inspirations growing perpetually. Our collection of oak barrels has also become a primary element of our brewery. Nearly half of our beer is aged in wine or spirit barrels bringing forth flavors reminiscent of the Belgian countryside or classic American distillers. We greatly value our customers as well as our employees at The Bruery and want to give them all an impassioned way to spend their time while sharing a beer worth talking about.”

Random: Val made a ridiculously good banana bread this past weekend. It was divine.

The beer poured with a three finger, thick, tan head. It dissipated at a moderate pace and left some lacing on the glass. The body was a dark brown, but clear. I saw a small amount of carbonation. The nose was strong and smoky. There was a lot of booze as well. I didn’t pick up much else. The nose had a bit of bourbon and smoke and vanilla as well. There was some coffee too. The booze was present and a bit strong for my taste. The body was medium thickness with light carbonation present. It had a lengthy finish with bourbon. This wasn’t my favorite beer from The Bruery, but it was good. It’s worth a try.

Untappd Rating: 3.5/5.0

The Bruery Royal St. Sweets

Tonight’s beer is one from The Bruery. Let’s see how it was.

ABV: 9.7%

Style: American Double/Imperial Stout

Trivia: According to beeradvocate.com, “This beer was inspired by the artwork in the city and the sweet New Orleans-native treat, Bananas Foster. Royal St. Sweets is an imperial stout brewed with hand-peeled banana, vanilla beans, and fresh cinnamon, creating a flambéed liquid decadence fit for the heart of the French Quarter. Rich with aromas and the taste reminiscent of caramelized bananas, rounded out with smooth vanilla and hints of cinnamon. This beer pours a dark black with a rich, brown head. Creamy and viscous with a full body that won’t stop. Pass a good time avec vos amis, et laissez les bon temps rouler!”

Random: I’ve never been to New Orleans, but want to go. I’d prefer to avoid the Summer, though, because I hate humidity.

The beer poured with a two finger, thick, tan head. It dissipated slowly and left a lot of lacing on the glass. The body was dark brown, almost black. There was no visible carbonation due to the color. The nose on the beer was exceptionally sweet. There was milk chocolate, banana, vanilla and some smoke as well. The taste was equally sweet. There was a decent amount of roasted malts and milk chocolate up front and quickly went into banana and cinnamon. There was also some vanilla and smoke. There was some booze as well. The body was on the thicker side with light carbonation. It had a sticky and lengthy finish. I enjoyed this beer, but I could only have one due to the sweetness.

Untappd Rating: 4.0/5.0